The Most Popular Slang for Each Year Starting from 1926


       

Every year brings with it a new set of words, colloquialisms, and jargon. While some of the terms don’t take end up “sticking”, others get more popular and are used for years to come.

Scroll down to discover which slang was popular the year you were born.

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#81 Gold-dig in 1926

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Gold-dig was slang used for women who cared about men for their money only. It came from the book appropriately-titled “Mantrap” by Sinclair Lewis.

#80 It Girl in 1927

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Clara Bow of Hollywood was nicknamed the “It Girl”.

#79 Baloney in 1928

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Something fake or phony is referred to as baloney. This word can be traced back to an article in The Saturday Evening Post and is still used today.

#78 It Boy in 1929

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After the “It Girl” came the “It Boy”, which referred to any good-looking young man.

#77 Booksy in 1930

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Booksy referred to someone with an interest in reading.

#76 Snazzy in 1931

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Snazzy was used for the elegant but flashy style Hollywood actors and heartbreakers.

#75 Burp in 1932

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The noise made when belching.

#74 Beered up in 1933

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To celebrate the repeal of Prohibition, this term came to use.

#73 Boffo in 1934

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Boffo—or a big laugh—originated from the flourishing comedy scene where something that produced a big laugh was called a “boffo”.

#72 Gramps in 1935

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Gramps referred to grandfather or—when used as an insult—any old man.

#71 Bingo in 1936

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This slang referred to the bingo halls where the popular game was played.

#70  Gunky in 1937

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Gunky meant something gross.

#69 Fave in 1938

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This was used to refer to a favorite thing—it’s still a term used today.

#68 Bad-mouthing in 1939

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This term was used in sports when one team would speak negatively about their opponent; speaking negatively was referred to as “bad-mouthing”.

#67 Baby blues in 1940

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Baby blues referred to postnatal depression experienced by new mothers.

#66 Dreamboat in 1941

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Another Hollywood term to refer to a handsome actor; for example, Cary Grant.

#65 Hyper in 1942

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This slang referred to hyperactive kids with too much energy; it’s still used today to refer to when people have an abundance of energy.

#64 Duh in 1943

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An offhand remark that probably originated from the Merry Melodies cartoon show.

#63 Tag-along on 1944

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Originally a military term that referred to a bomb, it was later given a new meaning—someone who attaches himself or herself unexpectedly to your plans.

#62 Doh in 1945

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Another offhand expression that originated from a radio program—“It’s That Man Again”—and was made infamous by the cartoon character, Homer Simpson.

#61 Cheese as in “cheesed-off” in 1946

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To be cheesed-off means to be very angry.

#60 Artsy in 1947

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Artsy referred to a pretentious style made popular by costume designer, Edith Head.

#59 Fannie Mae in 1948

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A government or trade slang for the Federal National Mortgage Association.

#58 Jet set in 1949

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The jet set crowd referred to rich young people living a fast and glamorous life.

#57 Beautiful people in 1950

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A Hollywood term referring to gorgeous women and handsome men working in the entertainment industry.

#56 Nerd in 1951

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An alternative to the word “square”, nerd was someone who is boring and outdated.

#55 Divey in 1952

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An article in The New Yorker used this term to refer to a bar that wasn’t posh, but comfortable.

#54 Hippie in 1953

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Used in 1953, the word didn’t become commonly used until the 60s.

#53 Boonies in 1954

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Originating in New Hampshire, this word referred to the middle of nowhere or backwood areas.

#52 Cool in 1955

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A timeless term used to describe a personality similar to James Dean, the king of cool.

#51 Nit-picker in 1956

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A term used to refer to a corporate manager who didn’t let things go.

#50 Endsville in 1957

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Slang used to refer to a place or the idea of a place that was much cooler than wherever you were. Also used to describe bands and records.

#49 Nuke in 1958

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An active year for nuclear testing, nuke was the short form of nuclear weapons.

#48 Hot-dog in 1959

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Derived from the California surf culture, hot-dog meant to show off.

#47 Dullsville in 1960

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A term exactly the opposite of Endsville.

#46 Bratty in 1961

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This term was often used to refer to baby boomers becoming older kids and teenagers in this decade.

#45 Drop-dead in 1962

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A term used in the fashion industry to describe something as gorgeous.

#44 Mickey Mouse in 1963

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To goof off on the job was to “Mickey Mouse”.

#43 Aw-shucks in 1964

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A slang used to describe someone who was pretending to be innocent. A term coined by writer Tom Wolfe.

#42 Grody in 1965

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Grody referred to people and places with a bad appearance.

#41 Kegger in 1966

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A party term that came from college life.

#40 Freak flag in 1967

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Coined by Jimi Hendrix, this was used to refer to unconventional behavior.

#39 Bippy in 1968

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Bippy refers to the rear end and was used in the television show “Laugh In”.

#38 Out of sight in 1969

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This slang was used to describe something as hard to believe, beyond belief.

#37 Dorky in 1970

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An alternate word for nerd and still used today.

#36 Deadheads in 1971

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Deadheads are followers of the band The Grateful Dead.

#35 Guilt trip in 1972

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Referred to group therapy sessions.

#34 Carbo in 1973

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A reference to carb.

#33 Motorhead in 1974

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Someone who really likes motorcycles. The following year, the Motorhead band was formed.

#32 Detox in 1975

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Increased need for alcohol drug rehabilitation; it also used to refer to the juices and diets adopted by the health-conscious people of California.

#31 Hardball in 1976

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A term used in a business context to refer to aggressive negotiation skills.

#30 Brewski in 1977

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Refers to beer.

#29 Pig-out in 1978

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Referred to a feast of junk food.

#28 Nostalgia-fest in 1979

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The desire of the baby boomers to look back and remember.

#27 Frizzy in 1980

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Hair that’s not curly, but frizzy.

#26 Chill pill in 1981

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Refers to being relaxed and not getting too excited.

#25 Buff in 1982

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Used to describe the male physique.

#24 Beatbox in 1983

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Originally used to describe electronic drum machines that made an entrance into the music scene. Later, the beatbox was used to describe the sounds that one can make with their mouth to replicate the sound of musical instruments.

#23 Major in 1984

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“Sixteen Candles” brought this word into the public conscious, which described people and things with that kind of enthusiasm that you can only manage as a teen.

#22 Radness in 1985

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The state of being “rad” (which was another term for being cool or popular).

#21 Studmuffin in 1986

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A handsome man like Denzel Washington.

#20 Couchsurfing in 1987

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Sitting around and watching TV all day.

#19 F-bomb in 1988

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This refers to something that has the ability to give a big shock.

#18 Trash talk in 1989

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Same as bad-mouth.

#17 Kewl in 1990

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An alternative to “cool”.

#16 Tighty Whiteys in 1991

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Men’s underwear.

#15 NOT in 1992

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An overused declaration originating from the movie “Wayne’s World”.

#14 Da Bomb in 1993

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Coined by Kriss Kross, the band.

#13 Benjamins in 1994

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$100 bills.

#12 As if in 1995

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Introduced by “Clueless”—an overused phrase.

#11 Whatever in 1996

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Another overused expression meaning disdain or disinterest.

#10 Jiggy in 1997

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Used by cool kids and dads, similar to Will Smith, and his popular song “Gettin’ Jiggy With It”.

#9 Phat in 1998

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Term popularized in 1998, stood for Pretty Hot and/or Tempting.

#8 Bling in 1999

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This refers to glitzy jewelry.

#7 Whassup in 2000

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A shorter version of the greeting “What’s up”.

#6 Whaletail in 2001

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Refers to low-rise jeans and thongs.

#5 Hella in 2002

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A shorter form of “hell of”.

#4 Peeps in 2003

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Peeps are friends who would do anything for you.

#3 Muffin top in 2004

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Someone who has a heavy torso.

#2 Fo shizzle/fo sheezy in 2005

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This means for sure and was introduced by Snoop Dogg.

#1 Sick in 2006

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Often used to refer to something that’s cool, it also was an alternate for “gross”.

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